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20110701
20110731
STATION
CSPAN 6
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
CNN 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jul 29, 2011 2:30pm PDT
"bbc world news america." a year after devastating rains ravitch pakistan, we return to the hardest-hit region to see how people are coping in the aftermath. -- a year after devastating rains ravage pakistan. one country right and the heart of europe appears to be a new to the currency crisis. switzerland's fanc is riding high and has become a safe haven for investors. >> this is a landscape that has attracted tourists for over a century. this year, visitors are staying on the ground. those that are here are counting their pennies. as the euro slides, the swiss franc rises and rises. foreign tourists find switzerland too expensive. meanwhile, the swiss are neglecting their on resorts in favor of a cheap holiday abroad. >> i am watching the situation with enormous concern. things have gotten worse. jobs and businesses are really in danger now and that is bad for our economy. >> the swiss franc is at an all- time high against the euro. a new study shows that a thousand hotels across the alps are threatened with closure. >> there will be job cuts. there has already been. each of the ho
CSPAN
Jul 25, 2011 11:00pm EDT
frankly operates a bit like the military in pakistan. it is a state within a state. they have their own economy and they had their own businesses and their revolution as it exists in egypt, the uprising as it exists, whatever you want to call it, has not yet focused on what will be that future role of this pebble in the room. the floor is open. yes. direct your question to somebody. push it up on the side, i think. [inaudible] the question is about yemen. when we talk about the arab spring and the uprising -- i would also like to hear little bit more about georgia. that seemed to be a key in the region. >> margot and david white at you say something about jordan and yemen. why would you start on yemen, the uprising of the yemen that has been going on for about a decade. and it has involved people from south yemen that are not too happy about the union of the two yemen's and the short end of the stick that they got. its minorities in the north near the saudi border that have had a revolution going on for several years and the tribal disputes. so there has been a long-standing conflict. d
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 9:30pm EDT
the pakistan border. this is a critical area for the insurgents and the cross border infiltration and this is a historic avenue for movement from pakistan into afghanistan. in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how will you characterize this? >> there is a significant amount of influx of insurgent fighters in the area, mostly from pakistan moving into afghanistan. >> tell us a little bit about your mission. >> this the standard reconnaissance mission, along the historic route from pakistan. the terrain is inaccessible, so we are going there to see what this looks like for a future clearing operation. the major challenges the terrain, which is extreme and very difficult to move. and also, the people there have not seen the coalition presence in some time. >> what do you hope to achieve to the mission. >> to accept these conditions for future operations and build our awareness of the atmosphere, so that we can continue the operations there. this is for the clear insurgent presence in the area. >> how do you tell if you have succeeded? >> the numbers that occur in the area, we have re
CNN
Jul 12, 2011 5:00pm EDT
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 6:30pm EDT
sightedness of it gets us in more trouble than anything else. pertaining to pakistan, having grown up there in the earlier years of my life, and it cannot tell you the immense good will that was there for the americans in the 1980's when we were fighting the soviets and freedom fighters of that time. the day the soviets left, the very next day everyone packed up their bags and left. that region was left with the master deal with on its own. come 9/11, all of a sudden they want that place to be fixed. well, no one was there for 13-14 years. we need to have a longer-term view. if we do not do that, there is no way we can solve our problems. thank you and i will listen offline. host: that may be a way to look at the broader question before we wrap up, but the remainder of the middle east long term. guest: this gets to the issue we spoke about earlier about whether the u.s. is going to support the democratic process in the future. i think the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the
CSPAN
Jul 22, 2011 1:00pm EDT
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 8:00pm EDT
, the india-pakistan war, which still defiance in many ways what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career, end of his life, in 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically. to him, the cold war -- the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia. his basic thesis was communism is dead in russia, but democracy has not yet won. for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about the leaders in russia, speaking on the topic. he gets a call from president palin ton. they had a conversation about clinton's russia policy. you can see in the squept months clinton russian policy change along the advice that was given by richard nixon. that is, as i see it, the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's eulogy. he talks about the last time he saw president nixon at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. without a note, president nixon stood and delivered a compelling speech, captures the global scene and sharing his visio
CSPAN
Jul 22, 2011 8:00pm EDT
laden had been living in a house in pakistan just an hour away from islamabad. helicopters raided the compound and landed a group of u.s. navy seals in a burst of gunfire, the al qaeda leader was killed, his body was. i see. americans celebrated his death in the world wondered about retaliation. i minister david cameron addressed the comment. >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women from britain was given their lives in the fight against terrorism across the world. we should pay tribute especially to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was the man who is responsible for 9/11, which was not only an horrific killing of americans, but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as that of the family group for united airlines flight 93 put it, we erased obviously never to hope for some and that. we are willing to make the section in this case. our world is a better place without him. >> of understanding satisfaction of those who lost family members in the inferno of 9/11
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)